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Miami Truck Accident Attorneys Talk About Recent Truck Crash Statistics

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”) is a federal agency responsible for compiling and analyzing statistic relating to large truck and bus accidents. The FMSCA falls under the U.S. Department of Transportation. The goal of these federal agencies is to make our roads safer, make highway travel more efficient, all while allowing people and businesses to conduct their business.  The FMCSA compiles data from large truck and bus crashes and passes regulations designed to reduce accidents. The Miami truck accident lawyers at Greenberg, Stone, & Urbano have a combined 130 years of experience representing truck crash victims and their families.

In 2014, there were 3,649 fatal large truck and bus crashes in the United States. In total, over 29,000 people lost their lives on the road in 2014.  The overwhelming majority of those accidents occurred in the eastern half of the US. Considering the number of trucks on the road and the number of miles driven by those trucks, the number of fatalities is relatively small.  In 2014, 260,350,938 registered vehicles took to the roads in the US. Among those vehicles, 8,328,759 were single-unit trucks. Meanwhile, FMCSA counted 2,577,197 tractor-trailer trucks registered in the US.  Overall, vehicles of all kinds drove 3,025.7 billion miles. Trucks traveled 279.1 billion of those miles, which is slightly over nine percent (9%) of all miles driven in 2014.  The number of non-fatal crashes was much higher in 2014. According to the FMCSA, there were 6,035,000 non-fatal crashes in the US. Among those, an estimated 472,000 involved large trucks.

The FMCSA analyzed the vehicle type driven in fatal large truck and bus crashes. Out of the 3,514 vehicle occupants killed, just over 1,400 rode in passenger cars while just over 1,100 traveled in light trucks. An additional 700 non-motorists, meaning pedestrians or bicyclists died in large truck accidents. Large trucks are deadly in work zones. Over 27.5% of all fatal crashes in work zones involved a large truck or bus. Florida was no stranger to fatal large truck and bus crashes in 2014. Heavier vehicles are deadlier than lighter trucks. The FMCSA defines a large truck as a vehicle having a gross weight exceeding 10,000 pounds. The most lethal trucks weight 33,000 pounds or more.

Florida is no stranger to deadly crashes. In 2014, Florida suffered 207 fatal large truck crashes. Large trucks and buses traversed 201,040,000 miles of Florida’s roads in 2014, making the fatality rate 0.10 per 1 million vehicle miles traveled. That number seems relatively small, but the human cost in lives cannot be measured by mere statistics and the counting of crashes. In every one of those 207 fatal crashes at least one life destroyed and one family devastated.

The FMCSA did not produce the number of non-fatal accidents in Florida that involved large trucks. Although, given the national trends, one can assume that the number of non-fatal crashes was much, much higher. Non-fatal accidents are devastating, despite no loss of life. Notwithstanding lives can be irrevocably changed forever in the aftermath of large truck crashes. Motorists suffer serious, life-altering injuries. Injured motorists, including truckers themselves, account for thousands of work hours missed, and millions of dollars in property losses. Large truck accidents cause an enormous amount of carnage on our roads. While the FMCSA works to reduce the number of fatal crashes, the goal should be to eradicate large truck crashes.

Help For Victims

If you or a loved one suffered personal injuries or death in a truck crash on Florida’s highways, speak with the South Florida truck accident lawyers at Greenberg, Stone, & Urbano. With over 130 years of collective legal experience, our seasoned attorneys know how to help you fight for the compensation you deserve.  The Miami Herald rated Greenberg, Stone, & Urbano as a top Miami litigation firm and Martindale-Hubbell gave them the coveted AV rating.  Call 888-499-9700 or (305) 595-2400 or visit our website to find out why.

Source:

http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/59000/59100/59189/2016_Pocket_Guide_to_Large_Truck_and_Bus_Statistics.pdf

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